Provider Q & A

Our patient-centered approach to health care thrives on trust, mutual respect and open communication between patient and provider. To foster that, we present a growing list of Q&As with our providers that look beyond their resumes and focus on what motivates them inside and outside their medical practices. Get to know your provider, and enjoy the improved health benefits that our patient-centered approach delivers.

Q & A with Susan Hage, DO

Susan Hage, DOHow does a professional modern dancer become a physician? What inspires a person to relocate to Midcoast Maine during their very first visit here? And how has physiatry accumulated so many hip monikers? These are the questions Susan Hage, DO, has faced for much of her career. Raised in Detroit and a graduate of Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Dr. Hage joined Waldo County General Hospital (WCGH) in 2015 and now sees patients at both WCGH and Pen Bay Medical Center. For more information about Dr. Hage, call 207-548-2475

What inspired you to practice medicine? I have many family members who are physicians, so the idea was instilled early on. I know it sounds hokey, but I was about 4 years old when I said I wanted to be a doctor. In college, my first choice was to be a clinical child psychologist. Then I changed my major to physical therapy and then to pre-med. In the end, I earned two bachelor’s degrees, one in psychology and one in dance.

Dance? I’ve danced since I was 13 years old. When I was in medical school, I was in a professional modern dance company. During my residency, I was anon-call physician for the Atlanta Ballet and took classes there. When I was a physician working in a Michigan hospital, a PR person for the hospital came by and said, ‘Hey, I hear you have a background in dance.’ He was also the director of a local community theater, and he asked if I would choreograph a musical for them. So I choreographed musicals while I was a practicing physician.

Was there an internal debate about what path you would take, dance or medicine? A huge debate! In my last year of college, my professors were really pushing for me to pursue a career as a professional dancer. Then the acceptance letter for medical school came in. There was about a month of going back and forth. In the end, even though I believe both make the world a better place, I thought I could make a bigger impact in medicine.

Does dance inform your medical practice? I think I understand anatomy and biomechanics on a deeper level because of my dancing. Having been an athlete and an artist who uses her body as an instrument, I’ve had my share of sports injuries. So when my patients tell me what’s bothering them, I understand what they’re feeling.

How do you approach new patients? I try to understand them, from their activity level to their psychosocial well-being to their nutrition. Self-care is the baseline – taking care of your body as a physical structure through posture, biomechanics, stretching and strength training. In many cases, medications and injections provide relief for three hours or three months, but they’re not cures. The thing that makes a lasting difference is when you’re working with the mind and the body, with injections layered in as necessary. By the time folks come to see me, they’ve been living with something chronically. So there is often an emotional component. We talk about relaxation, meditation, positive perceptions, affirmation, journaling, and prayer, whatever resonates for the patient.

Does the term ‘holistic practitioner’ apply to what you do? I would say so. I treat the whole person. And I think that’s really the physiatrist’s approach. I think what physiatrists have always done is now being given hip names, like lifestyle medicine, like integrative medicine, like holistic medicine, like self-care, but these are things we’ve always focused on.

Why Maine? I grew up in Detroit and did my residency in Atlanta. I wanted to try a different way of life. I had a friend in my residency who said, ‘Why don’t you think about coming up to Maine?’ So my husband and I came up to take a look over Easter. I saw the Camden Hills. I saw the ocean. When I saw the Camden Opera House, as a dancer I just said, ‘I think I’m home.’ We bought a house the very next day! When we went back to Michigan for a year after my first child was born, I just couldn’t shake how much I missed Maine – its natural beauty, the quality of life, the sense of community.

Learn more about physical and integrative medicine.

Q & A with Sally Kirkpatrick, MD

Sally KirkpatrickAbout the only thing knitting and doctoring would seem to have in common is that they involve needles. Dig a little deeper, though, and it is clear that both provided a strong sense of meaning in the life of Sally Kirkpatrick, MD, a neurologist at Pen Bay Medical Center.

Dr. Kirkpatrick joined the neurology practice at PBMC earlier this year. A graduate of the MCP Hahnemann University School of Medicine, she served her residencies at Harvard Medical School. Neurology is a branch of medicine dealing with disorders of the nervous system and includes patients suffering from conditions such as migraines, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, stroke, epilepsy, nerve and muscle disorders, and movement disorders. For more information about Dr. Kirkpatrick, call her office at 207-301-5757.

How do you approach a new patient? I start appointments by saying, “OK, tell me your story.” We usually talk for half the appointment, about half an hour or so. Then I examine them. A neuro exam is different from any other medical exam. First, you only have to take off your shoes. I play games with the patient, poke them, and hit them with reflex hammers. It doesn’t hurt, in fact it might tickle. I ask what some people might think are weird questions. But the patient’s answers tell me about their nervous system, and it’s useful. Then I tell them what I think and we go from there.

Who inspired you to go to medical school? My dad is a doctor. I always had the impression from him that medicine was worth devoting your life to. I actually thought I wanted to be a psychiatrist. But in medical school I had wonderful rotation in neurology and that got me interested in being a neurologist.

What has been your biggest challenge in medicine? I think that, fundamentally, medicine is a beautiful calling, but there are many obstacles. The biggest challenge is the business aspects of medicine. When a patient comes in to my exam room and we close the door, we are all that is there: no insurance, no hospital. We’re not checking boxes.

What are you interests outside the hospital?
My passion is fiber arts. Knit, spin, felt weave, dye. I make clothes and felted scarves. I take an approach called ‘weaving a life,’ where you use weaving as a way of self-examination. You weave little items, a doll for example. They’re sort of archetypal and as you weave them you think about different things. The loom becomes a framework for looking at your life. As you move the back and forth strings through the up and down strings, it’s contemplative. This approach was formalized by Susan Barrett Merrill. There is a progression to what you weave. It’s like taking a journey.

What can you tell us about yourself that we probably don’t know?
I home schooled my children. It was the most fun thing I have ever done. It was live neurology. I was watching these young brains learn. It gave me a lot of respect for the importance of nurturing children and being in a safe environment to learn. We started doing it because my son, who we knew was smart, was having a hard time learning how to read. We investigated a lot of options and in the end decided to try teaching him at home. He stopped being anxious and he learned to read. It turned out that he was dyslexic. We did a lot of multi-sensory learning, so it gave me an appreciation for the whole of the nervous system. I now use that experience when I talk to people with dementia. They always want to talk about their memories, but I tell them there is so much more they can do: listen to music, make music, make beautiful things, dance. There’s so much more that your brain can do.

You have practiced medicine in Maine for 25 years. Why Maine?
We came here because my husband’s family had a summer place here and we thought it would be wonderful to live here. Obviously, it’s beautiful but we like the authenticity. People are very straightforward. It has been a great place to raise our kids. They had a ton of freedom. They could ride their bikes wherever they wanted. They could walk to friends’ houses, and go buy too much candy and have the lady at the store say, “I’m going to tell your mother how much candy you’re buying.” It was great.

Learn more about neurology and Pen Bay Medical Center.


Q & A with Jeffrey Rasmussen, MD

Jeffrey F Rasmussen, MDWhat does an NBA All-Star and a lobsterman have in common? Jeffrey Rasmussen, MD, knows the answer. Dr. Rasmussen has served on the medical teams for a number of college and professional sports teams – including the Boston Celtics. These days he treats patients, including lobstermen, at Pen Bay Orthopedics, a department of Pen Bay Medical Center. A surgeon who specializes in sports medicine, minimally invasive shoulder and knee surgery, and shoulder replacement, Dr. Rasmussen sees patients from across Maine. For more information, call his office at 207-301-5454. To learn what an NBA All-Star and a lobsterman have in common, read on.

Let’s start with congratulations. You and your wife just welcomed your third child.
Yes, we did, thank you. Lucky number three, Emma Rasmussen, was born on October 25th. I also have a little boy, Patrick, who turned 3 this past summer, and a little girl, Allison, who will be 2 in January. It’s is a busy household and a bit crazy at times.

What inspired you to a life in medicine?
My mother had Crohn’s disease when I was young and was in and out of the hospital often. Based on that experience, I always said I wanted to get into medicine to help people. As a kid, I loved sports. All I did was play sports. Becoming a sports medicine doctor was the natural fit. It allowed me to work with patients and athletes of all ages who want to stay active.

As I understand it, you had an interesting start to your medical career.
I was fortunate to have worked with athletes for several teams in the Boston area, including Harvard University and the Boston Celtics. It was a great experience, especially in terms of understanding the expectations of the athletes, coaches, and trainers. I've been lucky to have worked with elite athletes while learning from some very talented surgeons and physicians.

How does having worked with elite athletes influence your work with patients at Pen Bay Medical Center?
Patients get injured and the medical or surgical options are pretty much the same no matter where you live or practice. What elite athletes demand is an orthopedic doctor who takes the time to understand their lives and what kind of outcome they want from treatment. I believe that everyone, from the young high school athlete to older manual laborer, deserves that same kind of care. It's about understanding what the patient wants and how I can meet those expectations. The 16-year-old student athlete who tears their ACL on the soccer field may have different expectations and constraints than the 60-year-old lobsterman who needs to get back to pulling pots the next day. I work hard to understand their needs and expectations and craft a medical response tailored to their lives.

When you meet a patient for the first time, what can they expect?
I start by asking patients to tell me about themselves. Where do you live? What do you do for work? What activities bring you satisfaction? I want to get to know them on a personal level and that, combined with a good history and exam, helps guide the best medical response for the patient.


What has been your most satisfying moment in medicine?
Every time I get a hug after doing a shoulder replacement. Some of my happiest patients are my shoulder replacements. Equally as satisfying is the smile on a young athlete’s face when they are cleared to return to their sport. That's pretty special.

How about outside the hospital?
I spend most of my time with my wife, Chrissy, and the kids. Outside of that, I love to play golf. We have some beautiful courses in Maine, including Samoset Resort right here in Rockport. We fill our summers with family and friends who come to visit Maine. During the winter, I play hockey at the MidCoast Recreation Center.


Why practice medicine in Maine?
I'm from Geneseo, a small town in western New York, south of Rochester. It's a very small town, maybe 10,000 people. After college at Cornell University, I went to medical school at the University of Maryland in Baltimore and then lived in New Jersey and Boston – so a lot of city living. After we had our first child, we asked ourselves, are we staying in Boston or are we looking for something new? We came up to visit Camden and said, let's do this. It’s a great, close-knit community. We can walk to friends’ houses and we can walk downtown. It's just a great place to raise a family.

Q & A with Robert Grondahl, MD

Robert E Grondahl, MDWhen some people think of U.S. Army doctors, they think of MASH, the 1970s television comedy-drama about a combat surgical unit in the Korean War. For Robert Grondahl, MD, 17 years in the Army was so much more. The son of a school nurse, Dr. Grondahl entered the Army searching for direction. He returned to civilian life 17 years later with medical degree in hand and years of experience as a family practitioner, obstetrician and gynecologist. Dr. Grondahl joined Waldo County Medical Partners Women’s Health this month and is accepting new patients. His office can be reached at 207-505-4332.

Who inspired you to go to medical school?
Well, my mom was a nurse, so she was probably my first inspiration. She did mostly school nursing, so I got to see a little bit about what she did, and occasionally I would see her helping people who were hurting. That made a deep impression on me. Out of high school, I went into the Army not knowing what else to do and realized, even though it was fun to jump out of planes and do Army stuff, that it wasn’t a good fit. That’s when I really became interested in medicine. So I requested an educational delay to go to medical school in Syracuse, New York. The Army said, “All right, it’s worth it to us to have you as a physician as opposed to an infantry man. Go for it.”

And you continued to serve in the Army after medical school?
I really wanted to practice in a rural setting and do it all. So I did a full residency in Family Practice before re-entering the Army. When I went back on active duty, I went to Fort Campbell in Kentucky and for the next four years I really got to “do it all” in the base hospital there. All kinds of cases - from obstetrics to internal medicine and pediatrics, and lots of them. It was a great experience. But it was a time that medicine was really starting to emphasize specialties, and I felt I had to make a decision about my career. I loved obstetrics. I mean, when I learned the cardinal movements of the fetus in labor, and when I got to see labor progress from start to finish – it was such a natural fit. But I also loved surgery. So, combining the desire to do both surgery and obstetrics, I did a second residency in OB/ GYN in San Antonio, Texas. After that, I went to Fort Bragg in North Carolina and got to really practice my specialty in the base hospital. It was high volume, so we did about 300 deliveries a month. And there was a high GYN surgical volume as well. This is all while I’m still on active duty, so I still got to do Army stuff, because that’s just fun, and then got to practice as an OB-GYN.

How does your military experience inform your practice of medicine?
The idea of flexibility comes to mind. In the Army, we always said, “improvise and overcome,” because you just never knew what was going to get thrown at you. Doing field medicine, moving around, and dealing with all of the unknowns, I think, helps me. It gives me a broad base of knowledge and a calmness.

And then you decided to return to civilian life?
In the Army, they tend to keep promoting you until eventually you’re in charge of something. I have the utmost respect for administrators, but I know myself well enough to know that I’m not one of them. The Army wanted me to take over the department at Fort Bragg, but that would have left me with just a half day of surgery per month and a half day of clinical work. I didn’t want to give those things up. What I love is what happens when I meet a patient for the first time. I have this privilege of being able to listen first, and then problem solve with that patient, and help make a plan that’s going to make a real difference.

So what can a new patient expect when they meet you for the first time?
Very rarely is that first visit just a nonchalant, “Yeah, I’m here for my cough. Do I need an antibiotic?” It’s filled with all kinds of questions, wonders, worries, fears, hopes, dreams. The first thing I do is to make the patient comfortable because it’s natural that they’d be nervous about meeting a new provider, especially one who will be helping them with some of the most important things in their life. I try to listen more than I talk and understand their hopes and dreams. What’s most important to me is that the patient knows they have been listened to.

So you start a successful practice in Indiana but end up in Maine... Once out of the Army, I built my dream practice in Indianapolis. I knew all my patients. New patients would just keep coming in because of word of mouth. But then, as our kids grew up and went out on their own, it became clear to me and my wife that our hearts were Maine. We have friends throughout New England and were visiting Maine every chance we got. We love winter things. We love to put micro spikes on and hike up an icy mountain. We like to snowshoe, we like to cross-country and Nordic ski, we downhill ski, we just love that stuff. But we didn’t want to just come here someday to retire. I’m not tired yet. I’ve got 20 more years of medicine in me, easy. I want to do a good job, and I want to have roots in the community where I practice medicine. I came here for my interview during a Nor’easter and someone apologized for the weather. But to me it was perfect.

Q & A with Mario Serafini, DO

Mario Serafini, DOHow do you define success? As Mario Serafini, DO, has learned, the answer is both complicated and as simple as listening to what matters most to his patients. A specialist in interventional pain management, Dr. Serafini practices out of the Pen Bay Physical Medicine & Interventional Pain Management at Pen Bay Medical Center (PBMC). He helps patients manage pain so they can get back to the activities that matter most to their lives, from gardening to picking up their grandchildren. Specialists in interventional pain management strive for opioid-free pain treatment that includes such procedures as joint injections, nerve blocks, spinal cord stimulation and peripheral nerve stimulation, among others. Dr. Serafini is married to Sarah Serafini, MD, an emergency department doctor at PBMC. Dr. Mario Serafini’s office can be reached at 207-301-3600.

In college, you interned as a bond trader on Wall Street and seemed destined for a career in financial services. What changed your mind?
I have always believed in doing good. At the time, I thought you could have this in the financial industries. It was in the 1980s and a very exciting time. But as I became entrenched in the financial services community, it seemed much less like I was doing good. I became disenchanted. So I applied to medical school. It fit my idealistic view of trying to help people.

Is there a moment that confirms your choice?
I met with a retired lobsterman from one of the islands. He’s 90 and has many medical conditions and he takes care of his wife, who suffers from dementia. So what I had offered him was a very simple, straightforward, non-exciting injection that I thought would bring him some relief to meet his goal of being able to continue caring for his wife at home. So one day he comes in for a follow-up appointment, and I ask him his percentage of pain relief and he says 30 percent, which normally is considered a therapeutic failure. And yet he is so happy because he is able to take care of his wife and some of the pain is gone, and for him that’s awesome! And it really helped to reset my understanding of how I help people. An outcome study would call a 30 percent reduction in pain a failure, and yet from this patient’s point of view, it was an absolute success. It was just this meaningful kind of experience because he made this ferry ride over to thank me for how much better he was doing.

You’ve expressed appreciation for the outdoors. How active are you?
Dramatically less these days with a 4-year-old and an 18-month old at home. We want to take our kayaks out but we’re wondering if a canoe might be better so we can take the children. When I first took up skiing, I wanted to be one of those people who straps the skis to their back, walks up the mountain and skiis back down through the trees. That’s incredibly hard thing to do. I’ll tell you that it pales in comparison to taking a 4-year-old to the Snow Bowl, with all of his gear, and trying to get on the lift.


How does this inform how you work with patients?
It’s relatively easy to measure pain. A patient gives us a number on a scale of 1 to 10 and we write it down. Easy. But when you talk to the patient more, you come to realize that it’s not really about the pain as much as it’s about loss – the loss of things and passions that they can no longer do. Because of the pain, they’re not able to garden, they’re not able to pick up their grandchildren. In that regard, my outdoor activities and my children give me important context; I know how much loss I would feel if I could no longer take my kids up Mount Battie. It fuels empathy. I can stand in a patient’s shoes and imagine their sense of loss. I think that makes me a better doctor.

What will a patient experience when they visit you for the first time?
We’ll sit and talk for a while as we get to know one another. I certainly want to hear about their pain, but I also want to hear about what they value most in their lives and what they want from me as a doctor. As we discuss treatment options, we ask, ‘This pain prevents me from doing this. Will the proposed intervention allow me to do it again?’ It’s a balancing act. We want to help people return to those activities that are most important to them. But we also want to protect them from unnecessary procedures that don’t have a reasonable risk-benefit profile.

How did you come to practice medicine in Maine?
We were living in Appalachia. When my wife finished her medical training, we moved to Burlington, Vermont. After we had our second child, we moved to South Carolina to be near family. But the commute was long which meant we were seeing our children even less. Then my wife tells me, ‘Oh, I’ve applied for a position in Rockport, Maine, and they may have a position for you, too.’ My response was, Where are the boxes? Let’s start packing.

Q & A with Lisa Sherwood, MD

 Lisa Sherwood, MDFor Lisa Sherwood, MD, joining Pen Bay Medical Center as an internist represents a homecoming of sorts. Her great-grandparents lived in Machias and she visited frequently as a kid. Moreover, her parents now live in South Thomaston. The move also represents a professional homecoming. After several years of teaching medical students at the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in State College, Penn., Dr. Sherwood’s move to PBMC is a return to the very reason she became a doctor – to focus on patients. Dr. Sherwood is currently accepting new patients. To make an appointment, please call her office at Pen Bay Internal Medicine at 207-301-5800.

What inspired you to pursue a life in medicine?
Out of high school, I earned bachelor’s degree in physical therapy and worked as a physical therapist for 10 years. I really enjoyed that, but I was very limited with how much care I could provide the people I was working with. I wanted to be more involved in their care. I was fortunate that my husband had gone back to physical therapy school in his 30’s and so he understood what it was to want to pursue a dream. He encouraged me, and I attended Penn State College of Medicine, did my residency in internal medicine there and stayed on there for 15 years before joining PBMC. At Penn State, I served as course director for first- and second-year medical students. I loved teaching them how to be a physician who is empathetic and knows how to listen.

How do you bring empathy and listening in to your own exam room?
I shared with my students studies that show a doctor usually interrupts a patient within eight seconds of the patient talking. I get it. Doctors are on a schedule and they want to keep things moving. But, if you just take the time to listen, you can often get most of the information you need without asking a question or interrupting a patient. I pride myself on getting to know my patients really well. Over the years, I’ve gotten so many nice emails from my patients thanking me for taking the time to know them and remembering little things about who they are as a person, not just who they are in terms of their diabetes or their high blood pressure.

Are you a natural listener?
I’m not a natural listener. It’s a skill I’ve had to develop. I learned from some really powerful teachers who had great relationships with their patients, and I thought to myself, ‘That’s the type of relationship I want to have with my patients.’

What’s life like outside of the hospital?
I really like to be outdoors. I like to garden. We hike and bike and camp. I have two cats who are my babies now that my son is out of the house. And I love to read. Have you ever been to Lobster Lane books? In South Thomaston there’s this little shack that’s open on Saturdays and Sundays. You can get $1.50 softcovers and $2.50 hardcovers. I usually go there and stock up on books to read over the next six months. I really enjoy reading.

What are you reading right now?
There’s a Maine Windjammer Mystery Series by Jenifer LeClair that I’m reading right now. I like all kinds of books, but mostly mysteries, and I like Maine authors.

You worked in a very large academic medical center before coming to PBMC. Why the move to Maine?
My parents live in South Thomaston. So, the fact that I can be closer to them and still practice medicine is important. But Maine has always had a special place in my heart because of my great-grandparents being from Machias. As a kid, I came to Maine every summer to the Downeast Lakes Region around Grand Lake Stream and Big Lake. I wanted to share those type of memories with my own son, and so we’ve been bringing him to Maine every summer since he was 2 years old. I just think there’s a way of life here that is different from anywhere else I’ve ever visited. There’s a focus on quality, a connectedness between people and nature, and I think that’s really important. Of course, in coming to Maine, I won’t be teaching medical students directly, which I loved, but that’s OK. The more I got involved in educating students, the further I got from patient care and, for me, patient care is why I got into medicine in the first place. So coming to Maine reconnects me to all kinds of things that I love.

Q & A with Jeffrey Rasmussen, MD

Jeffrey F Rasmussen, MDWhat does an NBA All-Star and a lobsterman have in common? Jeffrey Rasmussen, MD, knows the answer. Dr. Rasmussen has served on the medical teams for a number of college and professional sports teams – including the Boston Celtics. These days he treats patients, including lobstermen, at Pen Bay Orthopedics, a department of Pen Bay Medical Center. A surgeon who specializes in sports medicine, minimally invasive shoulder and knee surgery, and shoulder replacement, Dr. Rasmussen sees patients from across Maine. For more information, call his office at 207-301-5454 or visit Pen Bay Orthopedics online. To learn what an NBA All-Star and a lobsterman have in common, read on.

Let’s start with congratulations. You and your wife just welcomed your third child.
Yes, we did, thank you. Lucky number three, Emma Rasmussen, was born on October 25th. I also have a little boy, Patrick, who turned 3 this past summer, and a little girl, Allison, who will be 2 in January. It’s is a busy household and a bit crazy at times.

What inspired you to a life in medicine?
My mother had Crohn’s disease when I was young and was in and out of the hospital often. Based on that experience, I always said I wanted to get into medicine to help people. As a kid, I loved sports. All I did was play sports. Becoming a sports medicine doctor was the natural fit. It allowed me to work with patients and athletes of all ages who want to stay active.

As I understand it, you had an interesting start to your medical career.
I was fortunate to have worked with athletes for several teams in the Boston area, including Harvard University and the Boston Celtics. It was a great experience, especially in terms of understanding the expectations of the athletes, coaches, and trainers. I've been lucky to have worked with elite athletes while learning from some very talented surgeons and physicians.

How does having worked with elite athletes influence your work with patients at Pen Bay Medical Center?
Patients get injured and the medical or surgical options are pretty much the same no matter where you live or practice. What elite athletes demand is an orthopedic doctor who takes the time to understand their lives and what kind of outcome they want from treatment. I believe that everyone, from the young high school athlete to older manual laborer, deserves that same kind of care. It's about understanding what the patient wants and how I can meet those expectations. The 16-year-old student athlete who tears their ACL on the soccer field may have different expectations and constraints than the 60-year-old lobsterman who needs to get back to pulling pots the next day. I work hard to understand their needs and expectations and craft a medical response tailored to their lives.

When you meet a patient for the first time, what can they expect?
I start by asking patients to tell me about themselves. Where do you live? What do you do for work? What activities bring you satisfaction? I want to get to know them on a personal level and that, combined with a good history and exam, helps guide the best medical response for the patient.


What has been your most satisfying moment in medicine?
Every time I get a hug after doing a shoulder replacement. Some of my happiest patients are my shoulder replacements. Equally as satisfying is the smile on a young athlete’s face when they are cleared to return to their sport. That's pretty special.

How about outside the hospital?
I spend most of my time with my wife, Chrissy, and the kids. Outside of that, I love to play golf. We have some beautiful courses in Maine, including Samoset Resort right here in Rockport. We fill our summers with family and friends who come to visit Maine. During the winter, I play hockey at the MidCoast Recreation Center.


Why practice medicine in Maine?
I'm from Geneseo, a small town in western New York, south of Rochester. It's a very small town, maybe 10,000 people. After college at Cornell University, I went to medical school at the University of Maryland in Baltimore and then lived in New Jersey and Boston – so a lot of city living. After we had our first child, we asked ourselves, are we staying in Boston or are we looking for something new? We came up to visit Camden and said, let's do this. It’s a great, close-knit community. We can walk to friends’ houses and we can walk downtown. It's just a great place to raise a family.

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