Publications

  1. 5-2-1-0 goes to school: a pilot project testing the feasibility of schools adopting and delivering healthy messages during the school day.
    This study details a one-year pilot project during 2006-2007 where nine schools in southern Maine were provided with resource toolkits to promote healthy eating and physical activity using the 5-2-1-0 message. Evaluation results showed high satisfaction with the program among school administrators, high utilization of the tools among teachers, and an overall positive response among students.

    Link to article:
    http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/123/Supplement_5/S272.full

    Citation:
    Rogers VW, Motyka E. 5-2-1-0 goes to school: a pilot project testing the feasibility of schools adopting and delivering healthy messages during the school day. Pediatrics. 2009;123 Suppl 5:S272-6.
     
  2. Impact of a primary care intervention on physician practice and patient and family behavior: keep ME Healthy—the Maine Youth Overweight Collaborative.
    This study assesses a pediatric primary care-based intervention in clinical decision support and family management of obesity risk behaviors over an 18-month period (2004-2006) with 12 intervention sites located throughout Maine. Study results indicate large changes in clinical practice during the intervention: increases in assessment of Body Mass Index (BMI), use of the 5-2-1-0 behavioral screening tool, and weight classification. Parent surveys indicated higher rates of counseling for 5-2-1-0 targets in intervention versus control sites.

    Link to article:
    http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/123/Supplement_5/S258.full

    Citation:
    Polacsek M, Orr J, Letourneau L, Rogers V, Holmberg R, O'Rourke K., . . . Gortmaker S L. Impact of a primary care intervention on physician practice and patient and family behavior: keep ME Healthy—the Maine Youth Overweight Collaborative. Pediatrics. 2009;123 Suppl 5:S258-S266.
     
  3. CDC Grand Rounds: Childhood Obesity in the United States
    This report is based on a grand rounds presentation at the CDC and summarizes interventions showing evidence of improving environments that can lead to lower rates of obesity, including the Maine Youth Overweight Collaborative (MYOC) and Let’s Go!. Let’s Go! used the lessons learned and tools and resources developed in MYOC health care practices and took the 5-2-1-0 message to additional community settings, such as schools, and child care and after school programs.

    Link to article:
    https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6002a2.htm

    Citation:

    Centers for Disease C, Prevention. CDC grand rounds: childhood obesity in the United States. MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report. Jan 21 2011;60(2):42-46.
     
  4. Impact of Let’s Go! 5-2-1-0: A community-based, multisetting childhood obesity prevention program.
    This study examines results of a telephone survey conducted with 800 randomly selected parents at three points in time in 12 Maine communities where Let’s Go! strategies were implemented and the 5-2-1-0 message was promoted. Survey results showed improvements from 2007 to 2011 in parents’ awareness of the message and in children’s adherence to recommended behaviors.

    Link to article:
    https://academic.oup.com/jpepsy/article/38/9/1010/958053/Impact-of-Let-s-Go-5-2-1-0-A-Community-Based

    Citation:
    Rogers VW, Hart PH, Motyka E, Rines EN, Vine J, Deatrick DA. Impact of Let’s Go! 5-2-1-0: A community-based, multisetting childhood obesity prevention program. J Pediatr Psychol. 2013; 38(9):1010-1020.
     
  5. Sustainability of key Maine Youth Overweight Collaborative improvements: a follow-up study
    This study evaluates the sustainability of the primary care program, the Maine Youth Overweight Collaborative, at seven of the original intervention sites. Many key practice improvements observed in 2009 were sustained or improved three years post-intervention in 2012.

    Link to article:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4120928/

    Citation:
    Polacsek M, Orr J, O'Brien LM, Rogers VW, Fanburg J, Gortmaker SL. Sustainability of key Maine Youth Overweight Collaborative improvements: a follow-up study. Childhood Obesity. 2014;10(4): 326-333.
     
  6. Evaluation of a primary care intervention on body mass index: the Maine Youth Overweight Collaborative
    This study uses a retrospective longitudinal record review to evaluate the impact of the Maine Youth Overweight Collaborative primary care intervention on BMI z-score change among youth in intervention versus control sites. The study found no impact of the intervention on BMI z-scores.

    Link to article:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4382710/

    Citation:
    Gortmaker SL, Polacsek M, Letourneau L, Rogers VW, Holmberg R, Lombard KA, Fanburg J, Ware J, Orr J. Evaluation of a primary care intervention on body mass index: the Maine Youth Overweight Collaborative. Childhood Obesity. 2015;11(2):187-93.
     
  7. Let's Go! school nutrition workgroups: regional partnerships for improving school meals
    This report outlines best practices and results associated with Let’s Go!’s innovative School Nutrition Workgroup approach. This regional workgroup approach led to 77 schools achieving Healthier US School Challenge recognition and in school year 2011-2012 aided the implementation of Smarter Lunchrooms practices in 130 schools.

    Link to article:
    http://www.jneb.org/article/S1499-4046(14)00822-7/abstract?showall=true

    Citation:
    Kessler HL, Vine J, Rogers VW. Let's Go! school nutrition workgroups: regional partnerships for improving school meals. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2015;47(3):278-282.
     
  8. Smarter Lunchrooms and Let’s Go! Maine – A Perfect Match
    This online article highlights the Smarter Lunchrooms Movement and Let’s Go!’s use of their evidence-based strategies for guiding students to select and consume healthy food choices in schools. In 2016, a total of 169 Let’s Go! schools achieved Smarter Lunchroom recognition.

    Link to article:
    http://articles.extension.org/pages/73962/smarter-lunchrooms-and-lets-go-maine-a-perfect-match

    Citation:
    Kessler HL, Vine J. Smarter Lunchrooms and Let’s Go! Maine – A Perfect Match.
    http://articles.extension.org/pages/73962/smarter-lunchrooms-and-lets-go-maine-a-perfect-match. eXtension Healthy Food Choices in Schools. October 6, 2016.

  9. Policies and practices of high-performing Let’s Go! schools 
    Let’s Go! collaborated with researchers from RTI International on a study to identify specific program characteristics, policies and practices associated with higher performing Let’s Go! schools. Researchers analyzed the Let’s Go! school survey data set for 2013-2015 and found that enforced district wellness policies, school wellness teams, and family involvement are crucial components to the success of Let’s Go! schools.

    Link to article:
    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/19325037.2018.1489742?journalCode=ujhe20

    Citation:
    Giombi K, Wiecha J, Vine J, Rogers VW. Policies and practices of high-performing Let’s Go! schools. American Journal of Health Education. 2018:1-9.

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