Emergency Services

Stephens Memorial Hospital Emergency Services

For thousands of people in our community, the Emergency Services Department is truly the "Gateway to Care" at Stephens Memorial Hospital. The combination of an aging population with thousands of seasonal and uninsured residents means that 24 hours a day, 365 days a year our emergency services physicians and staff must be prepared to handle a myriad of problems. From broken bones to cardiac complications or psychiatric issues, the number of patients treated through our Emergency Department has steadily increased over the past few years to over 18,000 in 2008. 

The ER is a vital component to meeting the healthcare needs of the community. Stephens Memorial opened its new ER in November 2003 after a 13-month construction project funded by the Campaign for Exceptional Care. The new facility was designed to enhance patient and family privacy, comfort and convenience, as well as to maximize the efficiency and convenience for hospital staff.

Highlights of the Stephens Memorial's Emergency Department include:

  • New individual treatment and exam rooms
  • Patient observation rooms
  • Central registration
  • Expanded and comfortable waiting areas
  • Improved nursing staff workspace
  • Separate walk-in and ambulance entrances
  • Telepsychiatry Services

Emergency Care

Anyone can have a medical emergency. If there is an immediate threat to your health, you should go to the emergency department at the closest hospital for treatment. Do not drive a car if you are having a medical emergency. Call 911 for an ambulance.

Emergency care is needed when you have a sudden medical problem that requires immediate hospital care. Call 911 if you have to get to the hospital right away. Medics can start treatment on the way to the hospital. According to the American College of Emergency Physicians, these are warning signs that you are having a medical emergency:

  • Bleeding that will not stop
  • Breathing problems
  • Change in mental status (unusual behavior, confusion)
  • Chest pain
  • Choking
  • Coughing up blood
  • Fainting or loss of consciousness
  • Feeling like harming yourself or someone else
  • Head or spine injury
  • Severe or persistent vomiting
  • Sudden injury such as a car accident, burns or smoke inhalation, near drowning, deep or large wound, etc.
  • Sudden, severe pain anywhere in your body
  • Sudden dizziness, weakness or change in your vision
  • Swallowing a poisonous substance
  • Upper abdominal pain or pressure

If you experience any of these problems, call 911 immediately.

Here for you in an emergency

Do not drive a car if you are having a medical emergency. Call 911 for an ambulance. PACE is the only paramedic-licensed service in Oxford County. Maintaining coverage 24 hours a day, 7 days a week!
Learn more

Latest News

View All

Upcoming Classes & Events

View All